Fascia fitness to reduce back and injuries pain!

I’ve heard a lot about fascia fitness can this help me reduce my back and leg injuries from playing tennis and golf?

 

If you are fascinated with the role of fascia in fitness training to help reduce back and leg pain, the following questions lead to new information:

fascia fitness

  • There are ten times more sensory nerve endings in your fascia than in your muscles; hence, how do we aim proprioceptive stimulation at the fascia as well as the muscles?
  • Majority injuries are connective-tissue (fascia) injuries, not muscular injuries that we are so use to, so how do we excellently train to prevent and repair damage and build resilience and elasticity into the system?
  • Conventional anatomy texts of the muscles and fascia are inexact, based on a fundamental misinterpretation of our movement function—so how can we work with our fascia altogether, as the “organ system of stability”?

Intentionally or unintentionally, you have been working with fascia for your whole movement career—it is inevitable. Now, however, new research is reinforcing the significance of fascia and other connective tissue in functional training.

Research into the fascia fitness upsets both our long-established beliefs and some of our new favorites as well. The evidence all points to a new reflection within overall fitness for life—hence the term fascia fitness.

Most tennis players carry out movements that put a strain on the spine when playing tennis which include movements of stretching the back too much when serving, stopping constantly and starting, as well as vigorous twisting of the spine when executing the blow.

A tennis coach or physiotherapist can show you different warm up exercise that can help reduce stress on your back. For instance:

  • Bending your knees.
  • Keeping your abdominal muscles tense can reduce tension in your spine. Ask about the best ways to serve (pull out) to avoid overextending the lumbar region.

Before playing, always warm up and stretch the muscles of your legs and lower back. Learn exercises that strengthen the trunk muscles deep in the abdomen and pelvis, which support the spine.

As a golf player, golf swing requires vigorous rotation of the spine, and this puts a strain on muscles, ligaments, joints and spinal discs.

Suggestions to remove tension from your back include:

  • Ask your physical therapist about the most excellent posture and technique for your shot.
  • Warm up and stretch the muscles of your back and upper legs before beginning a round.
  • Crouch with your knees when you pick up the golf ball.
  • When in the field, use a cart to load your golf bag. ‘You can also drive a golf cart.

Here is a quick fascia fitness exercise you can do to help reduce injuries to your back and legs:

Lie face down on a towel with arms out in front of you in a V shape and feet separated. Press into your palms and draw the shoulder blades down and then do it jointly. Bending your elbows in, use your back muscles to glide your body forward and lift your chest.

Doing eight reps will help reduce the pain from injuries sustained from playing golf and tennis.

To read more please check out: www.natestretchandmore.com

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Fascia fitness to reduce back and injuries pain!